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Shozaloza: Train of dream and struggle

“Shozaloza African Voices” Bukelwa Velem, Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr and Jazz Band: Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums). Live Amateur footage from the Oudelibertas Amphitheater Show, Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 2014 To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com Read more […]

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“Shozaloza African Voices”

Bukelwa Velem, Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr

and Jazz Band:

Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums).


Live Amateur footage from the Oudelibertas Amphitheater Show, Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 2014

To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com

Read more about the original show here.

See photos from the shows here.

Members of “Shozaloza African Voices” have taken part in Cape Town Opera productions as soloists and chorus members. Their experience with Jazz influenced works such as Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha, Jerome Kern’s Showboat, Kurt Weil’s Lost in the Stars and Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess make them ideal interpreters of this work from the South African cultural heritage.

Download a Free Pdf of the Sheet Music of the song “SHOZALOZA”:

Shosholoza__SATB_ACappella

More about the song “SHOZALOZA”

Although the original author of the song is unknown, “Shosholoza” is a traditional miner’s song, originally sung by groups of men from the Ndebele ethnic group that travelled by steam train from their homes in Zimbabwe to work in South Africa’s diamond and gold mines. The Ndebele live predominantly in Zimbabwe (formerly, Rhodesia) near its border with South Africa, and they can also be found in the northern border of South Africa. The song mixes Ndebele and Zulu words and is Zimbabwean in origin even though the two ethnic groups are very similar.

Some people argue that the song describes the journey to the mines in South Africa, while others say it describes the return to Zimbabwe. It is also sometimes sung “stimela si phume Rhodesia”. It is accepted that  Zulu workers later took up the song to generate rhythm during group tasks and to alleviate boredom and stress. The song was sung by working miners in time with the rhythm of swinging their axes to dig. It was usually sung under hardship in call and response style (one man singing a solo line and the rest of the group responding by copying him). It was also sung by prisoners in call and response style using alto, soprano part divided by row. Former South African President Nelson Mandela describes how he sang Shosholoza as he worked during his imprisonment on Robben Island. He describes it as “a song that compares the apartheid struggle to the motion of an oncoming train” and goes on to explain that “the singing made the work lighter”.

In contemporary times, it is used in varied contexts in South Africa to show solidarity in sporting events and other national events to relay the message that the players are not alone and are part of a team.

 

Meaning

The song was usually sung to express the hardship of working in the mines. It expresses heartache over the hard work performed in the mines. The word Shosholoza or “chocholoza!” means go forward or make way for the next man, in Ndebele. It is used as a term of encouragement and hope for the workers as a sign of solidarity. The sound “sho sho” uses onomatopoeia and reminiscent of the sound made by the steam train (stimela). Stimela is the Zulu word for steam train.”Kulezo ntaba!” means (At those far away mountains), “Stimela Siphume eZimbabwe” (the train come from Zimbabwe), “Wen´ uya baleka” (Because you’re running away/hurrying). In contemporary times, its meaning is to show support for any struggle.

Lyrics

Lyrics Shosholoza

Shosholoza, shosholoza (Moving fast, moving strong)
Ku lezontaba (Through those mountains)
Stimela sphuma eSouth Africa (Train from South Africa)
Wenu yabaleka (You are leaving)
Wenu yabaleka (You are leaving)
Ku lezontaba (Through those mountains)
Stimela siphum’ eSouth Africa (Train from South Africa) 

The lyrics of the song vary, as do the transcriptions. In the older traditional styles, the words translate to “train from Rhodesia”.

Shosholoza
Kulezo ntaba
Stimela siphume South Africa
Kulezo ntaba
Stimela siphume South Africa
Wen’ uyabaleka
Kulezo ntaba
Stimela siphume South Africa

A rough translation:

Go forward
Go forward
from those mountains
on this train from South Africa
Go forward
Go forward
You are running away
You are running away
from those mountainson this train from Zimbabwe

One slightly sanitised version made popular at sporting events, goes like this:

English Translation of “Shoshaloza”:
Work, work, working in the sun
We will work as one
Shosholoza
Work, work, working in the rain
Till there’s sun again
Shosholoza
Push, push pushing on and on
There’s much to be done
Shosholoza
Push, push, pushing in the sun
We will push as one.
” Shosholoza is now a traditional staple in South Africa, and is celebrated by many cultures within the Rainbow Nation. When writing to a close friend in Cape Town about his thoughts on Shosholoza, and the significance of it to him as a young adult, he said,It fills me with a lot of pride in South Africa and in my lifetime has helped me to connect with my own sense of what it is to be from here. I remember my first experiences of it being during the 1995 world cup and that it was something black and white people sang together. Unity.-Edward O’Reilly, age 24. Firelight Foundation
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Video: Gershwin’s “Summertime” – Shozaloza African Voices LIVE

Video: Gershwin’s “Summertime” – “Shozaloza African Voices” Bukelwa Velem ,Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr and Jazz Band: Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums).     To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com Read more about the original show here. See photos […]

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Video: Gershwin’s “Summertime” – “Shozaloza African Voices”

Bukelwa Velem ,Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr

and Jazz Band: Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums).

 

 

To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com

Read more about the original show here.

See photos from the shows here.

Live Amateur footage from the Oudelibertas Amphitheater Show, Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 2014

Members of “Shozaloza African Voices” have taken part in Cape Town Opera productions as soloists and chorus members. Their experience with Jazz influenced works such as Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha, Jerome Kern’s Showboat,  Kurt Weil’s Lost in the Stars and Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess make them ideal interpreters of this work flowing between jazz and classical operatic genres.

Follow Albert on Twitter:
@albertcombrink

Find “The Summertime Connection” on FACEBOOK.

More about Gershwin’s song “Summertime”:

An Opera Aria that became a Jazz Standard, Gershwin’s “Summertime”has gained international fame as one of the most recorded songs of all time, with almost 35 ooo known recordings. Gershwin began composing the song/opera aria, for inclusion in his opera Porgy and Bess(America’s first serious “Jazz-Opera” after Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha” ) in December 1933. He attempted to create his own spiritual in the style of the African American folk music of the period. 

Two main sources of inspiration are usually quoted about this song:
1) The Book by DuBose Heyward had been presented as a play, and the spiritual “Sometimes I feel, like a motherless child”) was sung at the end. [Rosenberg, Deena (1991). Fascinating Rhythm: The Collaboration of George and Ira Gershwin. Penguin Books USA. ISBN 0-525-93356-5., p. 281]  The opening intervals of  “Summertime” do contain a melodic cell that reminds one of the spiritual.

2) The Ukrainian-Canadian composer and singer Alexis Kochan has suggested that some part of Gershwin’s inspiration may have come from having heard the Ukrainian lullaby, Oi Khodyt Son Kolo Vikon (A Dream Passes By The Windows) at a New York City performance by Oleksander Koshetz‘s Ukrainian National Chorus in 1929 (or 1926). [Helen Smindak, DATELINE NEW YORK: Kochan and Kytasty delve deeply into musical past, The Ukrainian Weekly, 24 May 1998]

Gershwin had completed setting DuBose Heyward’s poem to music by February 1934, and spent the next 20 months completing and orchestrating the score of the opera. [Howard Pollack, George Gershwin: his life and work, University of California Press, 2006, p.589]

The song is sung multiple times throughout Porgy and Bess, first by Clara in Act I as a lullaby and soon after as counterpoint to the craps game scene, in Act II in a reprise by Clara, and in Act III by Bess, singing to Clara’s baby. It was recorded for the first time by Abbie Mitchell on 19 July 1935, with George Gershwin playing the piano and conducting the orchestra (on: George Gershwin Conducts Excerpts from Porgy & Bess, Mark 56 667).

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Video: Back of the Moon (Matshikiza): Shozaloza African Voices Live

Video: Back of the Moon (Matshikiza): Shozaloza African Voices Live “Shozaloza African Voices”:  Bukelwa Velem ,Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr and Jazz Band: Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums). To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com Read more about the original […]

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Video: Back of the Moon (Matshikiza): Shozaloza African Voices Live

“Shozaloza African Voices”:  Bukelwa Velem ,Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr

and Jazz Band:

Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums).

To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com

Read more about the original show here.

See photos from the shows here.

Live Amateur footage from the Oudelibertas Amphitheater Show, Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 2014

 King Kong is of course one of the most famous American films ever made (and remade). The story of the giant ape transported from a faraway island to New York, captured the imagination of millions since its first release in 1933. South Africa however, has its own King Kong. In 1958  King Kong became the first all African Jazz Opera, with a star studded local cast including Miriam Makeba and the Manhattan Brothers, Kippie Moeketsi, Abigail Kubheka and Hugh Masekela.

Miranda Tini

Soloist is  Miranda Tini, whose extraordinary voice has thrilled audiences locally and internationally in roles as diverse as Jezibaba from Dvorak’s Rusalka and Mariah in Porgy and Bess praised at the Cardiff Millennium Centre in Wales, for her “powerful stage presence and equally powerful voice.” (Bill Kenny: Music Web International) 

Members of “Shozaloza African Voices” have taken part in Cape Town Opera productions as soloists and chorus members. Their experience with Jazz influenced works such as Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha, Jerome Kern’s Showboat,  Kurt Weil’s Lost in the Stars and Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess make them ideal interpreters of this neglected work from the South African cultural heritage.

In 1956, the Syndicate of African Artists commissioned Todd Matshikiza to write a large work for choir and orchestra. The composer had written successful choral works before, but since no orchestra was available, Uxolo was created on a massive scale for choirs and brass band. The success of this work – with its jazzy undertones, led in part to the creation of the musical/Jazz Opera King Kong. Lyrics were by Pat Williams. Matshikiza wrote the music as well of some of the lyrics (some in African languages).

Miriam Makeba: Our beloved “Mama Africa”

Lead roles were taken by Nathan Mdledle and Miriam Makeba, who created the role of Shebeen Queen Joyce, the matriarch running the Back of the Moon watering hole. This role brought Mama Africa Makeba international attention and launched a singing career that sustained her throughout her life as an Apartheid exile. The 63 member cast was backed by the cream of South Africa’s jazz musicians, including the now legendary reed playerKippie Moketsi.

 An_Evening_With_Belafonte_Makeba

Opening early in 1959 at the Wits University Great Hall, the show was an immediate success. By the time the show travelled to London in 1961, 200 000 South Africans, had seen the show. The life of boxer Ezekial Dhlamini was good material for a stage work. His meteoric rise to the top of South Africa’s boxing world as the famous ‘King Kong’ was in sad contrast to his descent into drunkenness, violence and murder. He killed himself by drowning at age 32. Matshikiza had covered Dhlamini’s 1950’s trial for treason as a journalist and was aboviously well-acquainted with his subject matter. According to The Daily Mail & Guardian, “Matshikiza understood his central character, and, more importantly, understood the whole world that surrounded ‘King Kong’. He understood the whole black world of the townships that fed Johannesburg and the histories of the people who filled those townships.” ~ Craig Harris, All Music Guide

 

Composer and author Todd Matshikiza

Todd Matshikiza (1921-1968)  is considered by many, as belonging to the royalty of South African music. One of a family of 10 – all of whom instrumentalists and singers –  Todd started piano lessons at the age of 6. As an adult he ran theTodd Matshikiza School of Music, where he also taught the piano. From 1949 to 1954, Matshikiza was a committee member of the Syndicate of African Artists. This group aimed to promote music in the townships by getting visiting artists to perform there. Finding it difficult to make a living as a jazz musician, he joined the editorial staff of Drum Magazine.  He wrote a jazz column covering the township scene, particularly in Sophiatown, where he commented on the likes of Kippie Moeketsi and Hugh Masekela who both played for the The Jazz Epistles. He also covered township life in his regular column With the lid off.

South African arts bosses should take note:  the time is surely right for a revival of King Kong.With local musicians taking  an active interest in the history of black jazz in this country, it would be a pleasant surprise if the Department of Arts, Culture, Science and Technology would also take such an active interest in the preservation of this piece of cultural heritage.

Read more about Todd Matshikiza at africancomposers.co.za andsacomposers.co.za

 

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Meadowlands: a song about what black people say about what white people say

MeadowLands (Strike Vilakazi) “Meadowlands“ is one of the most enduring melodies in South African music. The song was composed by Strike Vilakazi in 1956 as a moving, emotional comment on the forced removal of Sophiatown’s residents to the newly created township of Meadowlands, which is now part of Soweto, The lyrics are sung in three different languages […]

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MeadowLands (Strike Vilakazi)

“Meadowlands“ is one of the most enduring melodies in South African music. The song was composed by Strike Vilakazi in 1956 as a moving, emotional comment on the forced removal of Sophiatown’s residents to the newly created township of Meadowlands, which is now part of Soweto, The lyrics are sung in three different languages Zulu, Sesotho and tsotsitaal, the language of the streets- a mixture of English, Afrikaans, Zulu, Sesotho and Tswana. The lyrics are  ambiguous in their assessment, for or against, the government’s action. The white government thought the song supported their actions, but in reality it was a protest song about people refusing to go to Meadowlands.

Soweto_township

Africans perceived the forced removals as a cleaning up of the country, erasing ‘black spots’ to make ‘the picture look white.’ Sophiatown was rebuilt as white suburb called Triomf, the Afrikaans word for triumph. The removals sparked the creation of a song called “Meadowlands”, in reference to the Meadowlands township to which many Sophiatown residents were forced relocate. The lyrics express the devastation of the evacuation: “we will move all night and day/to go stay in meadowlands/you’ll hear the white people saying/let’s go to meadowlands.”

Dolly Rathebe on the cover of Drum Magazine (1928-2004)

Dolly Rathebe on the cover of the July 1955 Drum Magazine (1928-2004)

“Meadowlands” has a swing melody, and is sung in African languages, which masked its indictment of the callousness of white racism. so that white government officials and politicians, unable to understand, at the time thought the song was cheerful.

Read an interesting article Michela Versbow about the forced removals and the role of music in the South African struggle HERE.

The song was made famous by African Jazz Pioneers with Dolly Rathebe

The Zulu or Sesotho verse roughly translates to:

Let‘s go, let‘s go ,let‘s go to Meadowlands
We‘ll work night and day, going straight to Meadowlands
Have you heard what the white people say?
Let‘s all go to Meadowlands…
Our beloved place

The tsotsitaal version translates to something else:

Have you heard what the tstotsis all say
We are not leaving; we‘re are staying right here
Staying here, staying here
Staying here in our beloved place

The ambiguity is enhanced further by mixing Sesotho with tsotsitaal

Utla a utlwa makgowa a re a re yeng eMeadowlands (Sesotho)
You will hear the whites saying let‘s go to Meadowlands
Meadowlands, Meadowlands,
ons daak nie ons pola hie (tsotsitaal)
We are not leaving, we are staying right here

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The Click Song

The Click Song  Qongqothwane is a traditional song of the Xhosa people of South Africa. It is sung at weddings to bring good fortune. In thewestern world it is mainly known as The Click Song, a nickname given to the song by European colonials who could not pronounce its Xhosa title, which has many click consonants in it. The Xhosa title literally means “knock-knock beetle”, which is a popular […]

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The Click Song 

Qongqothwane is a traditional song of the Xhosa people of South Africa. It is sung at weddings to bring good fortune. In thewestern world it is mainly known as The Click Song, a nickname given to the song by European colonials who could not pronounce its Xhosa title, which has many click consonants in it. The Xhosa title literally means “knock-knock beetle”, which is a popular name for various species of darkling beetles that make a distinctive knocking sound by tapping their abdomens on the ground. These beetles are believed by the Xhosa to bring good luck and rain.

The song is known world-wide thanks to the interpretation of South African singer Miriam Makeba (herself a Xhosa). In her discography the songs appears in several versions, both with title Qongqothwane and as The Click Song.

images

LYRICS and TRANSLATION

There’s more info on this song in Miriam’s book The World of African Song (Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1971) with the following translation:

“The doctor of the road is the beetle/He climbed past this way They say it is the beetle/Oh! It is the beetle.”

She explains the song as a traditional folk song which refers to the knocking beetle which makes clicking sounds and can revolve the top part of its body in any direction. The beetle is used in children’s games to point the way home, but also has a deeper symbolism, pointing the way to a better future in times of trouble. In her biography (p.86), she mentions singing it in The Village Vanguard Club in New York, and calls it a “Xhosa song about a dreamy bride”

PenguinPoweredPiano gives quite an interesting version of the lyrics:

Qongqothwane is a song about where the village’s witch doctor can be found. This is important because it is the witch doctor who gives good blessings and advice for the future to the Xhosa’s newlyweds. But this witch doctor looks just like a normal person, not like what most people think of when they imagine a witch doctor — strange hair, charms, and all that. So sometimes, he can be hard to find since he looks like everyone else. He is compared to a “knocking beetle,” a type of beetle that makes an abrasive sound when it strikes its abdomen against the ground. Children play with these beetles, and they are said to lead the way home. In a way, the witch doctor is very like the beetle, as he leads the newlywed couple to a new future together in the same way that the beetle leads children home to where they belong.

Lyrics:

Igqira lendlela nguqo ngqothwane
The road’s witchdoctor is the knocking beetle

Igqirha lendlela kuthwa nguqo ngqothwane
The witchdoctor of the road is said to be the knocking beetle

Seleqabele gqi thapha nguqo ngqothwane
He has passed by up the steep hill, the knocking beetle

Selequbule gqi thapha nguqo ngqothwane
He did pass by up the steep hill, the knocking beetle

A version by the famous Miriam Makeba:

A version by “Shozaloza African Voices” in a medley with another famous South African Song, “Mama Thembu’s Wedding”:

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Video: “Pata Pata” – Shozaloza African Voices LIVE

“Pata Pata” is a song by South African singer Miriam Makeba the former wife of Hugh Masekela “Pata Pata” was written by fellow southern African artist Dorothy Masuka and first released by Makeba in 1957 when she still lived in South Africa. [Nkrumah, Gamal (17 November 2001). "Mama Africa". Profile (Cairo, Egypt: Al-Ahram Weekly). Retrieved 15 November 2010.] The song was released in […]

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Pata Pata” is a song by South African singer Miriam Makeba the former wife of Hugh Masekela “Pata Pata” was written by fellow southern African artist Dorothy Masuka and first released by Makeba in 1957 when she still lived in South Africa. [Nkrumah, Gamal (17 November 2001). "Mama Africa". Profile (Cairo, Egypt: Al-Ahram Weekly). Retrieved 15 November 2010.]

The song was released in the United States in 1967 for her studio album of the same name. It was successful on the Billboard Hot 100, and peaked at #12.

The song is considered by many to be Makeba’s signature hit and the song has since been covered by many artists. Originally written and sung in the Xhosa language, the song’s title means “touch touch” in English.

The original version of Pata Pata is included in Pata Pata (released 1972), The Best of the Early Years (Miriam Makeba), a collection of 24 tracks released in 2002 by Wrasse, and the 40 track compilation Her Essential Recordings: The Empress of African Song (2006 Manteca). Makeba released a renovated version of the song, entitled “Pata Pata 2000″, in her 2000 album Homeland.

Pata Pata Lyrics (Short Version):

Sat wuguga sat ju benga sat si pata pata
Aya sat wuguga sat ju benga sat si pata pata
A sat wuguga sat ju benga sat si pata pata

Chorus
Hihi ha mama, hi-a-ma sat si pata
A-hihi ha mama, hi-a-ma sat si pata pat

Line 1:
Pata Pata is the name of a dance we do down Johannesburg way.
Everybody starts to move as soon as Pata Pata starts to play.

Line 2:
Hoo, every Friday and Saturday night it’s Pata Pata-time.
The dance keeps going all night long till the morning sun begins to shine.

Pata Pata Lyrics (Full Version):

Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata

aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata
aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata
aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata
aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata

Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata

“Pata Pata” is the name of a dance we do down Johannesburg way.
And everybody starts to move as soon as “Pata Pata” starts to play – whoo

Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata

aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata
aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata
aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata
aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata

Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata

Whoo, every Friday and Saturday night it’s “Pata Pata” time
The dance keeps going all night long till the morning sun begins to shine – hey!
Aya sat waguqa sathi – wo-ho-o

Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata
Saguquka sathi bheka, nants’ iPata Pata

aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata
aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata
aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata
aHiyo mama ahiyo mama, nants’ iPata Pata

Saguqa sath’ – ahi ti!
Aah- saguqa sath’ – nantsi – ahi ti!
Saguqa sathi bheka nants’ iPata Pata

Summertime pic

 

 

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Video: Astor Piazzolla: Tanti anni prima (Ave Maria) arr. Cello & Piano

Astor Piazzolla: Tanti anni prima (Ave Maria) arr. Cello & Piano from the soundtrack to the “Enrico IV” byMarco Bellocchio   Website: Sarah Acres – http://www.facebook.com/CellistInTheCity Website: Albert Combrink – http://www.albertcombrink.com Twitter: @albertcombrink Read more about the original programme HERE  

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Astor Piazzolla: Tanti anni prima (Ave Maria) arr. Cello & Piano from the soundtrack to the “Enrico IV” byMarco Bellocchio

Enrico_iv_film

 

Website: Sarah Acres – http://www.facebook.com/CellistInTheCity
Website: Albert Combrink – http://www.albertcombrink.com
Twitter: @albertcombrink

Read more about the original programme HERE
Sarah Acres

Sarah Acres

 
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Video: Ntyilo Ntyilo (Stanislav Angelov & Albert Combrink)

Ntyilo Ntyilo “Little Bird” (Allan Mzamo Silinga) (South African Xhosa Song arranged in the Style of Piazzollla) perfromed by Stanislav Angelov (Bulgarian Accordionist) & Albert Combrink (South African Pianist) in the Tango-Duo Show “The Boer & The Bulgar” in the Theater of Alexander Bar, Cape Town. Read more about the show HERE Ntyilo Ntyilo “Little […]

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Ntyilo Ntyilo “Little Bird” (Allan Mzamo Silinga)

(South African Xhosa Song arranged in the Style of Piazzollla) perfromed by Stanislav Angelov (Bulgarian Accordionist) & Albert Combrink (South African Pianist) in the Tango-Duo Show “The Boer & The Bulgar” in the Theater of Alexander Bar, Cape Town.

Read more about the show HERE

Ntyilo Ntyilo “Little Bird” (Allan Mzamo Silinga): Sheet music, original Xhosa lyrics and English translation:

"Ntyilo Ntyilo" Sheet Music and original lyrics

“Ntyilo Ntyilo” Sheet Music and original lyrics

I heard a sound from the bush.

I looked up, I drew near.

The sound I heard was

Ti, li, ti, li, ti, li.

Ntyilo, Ntyilo, Ntyilo.

That melody was beautiful.

I heard the voice from the bush

1 looked up, I drew near.

The voice said:

‘ There is trouble in the land .’

Tra-la-tra-la.

That melody was beautiful.

The owner of the voice

Was dressed in white robes.

The owner of the voice

Was dressed in red robes.

the words were

Tra-la, tra-la, tra-la.

The melody was beautiful.

 

READ MORE ABOUT THE COMPOSER HERE.

 

The Boer & The Bulgar: Tango Duo Concert & Milonga

These 2 musicians have worked together for over a decade on different stages in different countries.

In this show they will explore their cultures and their interests, centering around the Tango Music which they have been performing together for over a decade. They will perform Tango music from both their cultures, Bulgaria and South Africa, and there will be space on the stage for Tango Dancers to take the stage. So if you are a Tango Dancer, bring your dancing shoes along, and if you are simply interested in watching, you can have a drink and relax and enjoy the sights.

The idea for this show came during their tour to Germany where they performed in the prestigious Leipzig Gewandhaus, and performed in Tango Clubs in Berlin, Leipzig and Tubingen.

Bookings essential!
Limited seats!

Bar and Restaurant available before, between and after shows.

When: Tuesday 22 October 2013,
Time: 7:30 for 8 pm & 9:30 for 10 pm

Price: R80

Bar and Restaurant available before, between and after shows.

Alexander Bar, 76 Strand Street , Cape Town CBD
MAP AND DIRECTIONS
VENUE PHOTOS

Booking: BOOK ONLINE
Information: 021 300 1652 / info@alexanderbar.co.za

ALEXANDER BAR ON FACEBOOK HERE
TWITTER : @alexanderbarct     /     @albertcombrink   /   @StanislavMusic      /     @TangoBand

CT TANGO ENSEMBLE ON FACEBOOK HERE

CT TANGO ENSEMBLE WEBSITE HERE.

ALBERT COMBRINK ARTIST PAGE ON FACEBOOK HERE

 

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Video: Malaika (Stanislav Angelov & Albert Combrink)

  Malaika (Swahili Folk Song) perfromed by Stanislav Angelov (Bulgarian Accordionist) & Albert Combrink (South African Pianist) in the Tango-Duo Show “The Boer & The Bulgar” in the Theater of Alexander Bar, Cape Town Read more about the show HERE: More about the song “Malaika” I grew up in Apartheid South Africa, and much of […]

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AlexanderCPTLogo

 

Malaika (Swahili Folk Song) perfromed by Stanislav Angelov (Bulgarian Accordionist) & Albert Combrink (South African Pianist) in the Tango-Duo Show “The Boer & The Bulgar” in the Theater of Alexander Bar, Cape Town

Read more about the show HERE:

More about the song “Malaika”

I grew up in Apartheid South Africa, and much of my South African musical heritage was lost on me – in my ignorance, or simply from never being in contact with it. I had heard of the wonderful South African singer Miriam Makeba, and it was in my varsity years, when the policital questions became too loud to remain unanswered, that I discovered the magical artistry of this woman, a singer who was living in political exile. I fell in love with her and with this song, the first moment I heard it. It had a melancholy which was iresistible.

“My baby, I love you, and if ony I had enough money to afford to come and get you, I would have married you

How simple. How touching. How absolutely heartbreachingly tragic. Sung by a woman far from her homeland, missing her family and loved ones, forbidden even from entering the borders of the land where her ancestors are burried. Heard by a boy exiled in all but name from a community that simply could not or would not connect with his political, social or sexual views. When she sang, she sang my sadness too. The sadness of incomprehension which a child feels when it knows there is something terribly wrong, but it has neither the experience, nor the vocabulary to understand it, let alone do anything about it.

Malaika is a Swahili song. Malaika generally means angel in Swahili. As is the case with many Swahili words, it is ultimately derived from Arabic. An alternative Swahili meaning is a “baby” or “small child“,hence at least one particular traditional version of the song titled Malaika being commonly used as a lullaby throughout East Africa.

 

“Malaika”: Lyrics in English and Swahili

Malaika, nakupenda Malaika
Angel, I love you angel
Malaika, nakupenda Malaika
Angel, I love you angel
Nami nifanyeje, kijana mwenzio
and I, what should I do, your young friend
Nashindwa na mali sina, we,
I am defeated by the bride price that I don’t have
Ningekuoa Malaika
I would marry you, angel
Nashindwa na mali sina, we,
I am defeated by the bride price that I don’t have
Ningekuoa Malaika
I would marry you, angel

Kidege, hukuwaza kidege
Little bird, I think of you little bird
Nami nifanyeje, kijana mwenzio
and I, what should I do, your young friend
Nashindwa na mali sina, we,
I am defeated by the bride price that I don’t have
Ningekuoa Malaika
I would marry you, angel
Nashindwa na mali sina, we,
I am defeated by the bride price that I don’t have
Ningekuoa, Malaika
I would marry you, angel

Pesa zasumbua roho yangu
The money (which I do not have) depresses my soul
Pesa zasumbua roho yangu
the money (which I do not have) depresses my soul
Nami nifanyeje, kijana mwenzio
and I, what should I do, your young friend
Ningekuoa Malaika
I would marry you, angel
Nashndwa na mali sina, we
I am defeated by the bride price that I don’t have
Ningekuoa Malaika
I would marry you, angel

The Boer & The Bulgar: Tango Duo Concert & Milonga

These 2 musicians have worked together for over a decade on different stages in different countries.

In this show they will explore their cultures and their interests, centering around the Tango Music which they have been performing together for over a decade. They will perform Tango music from both their cultures, Bulgaria and South Africa, and there will be space on the stage for Tango Dancers to take the stage. So if you are a Tango Dancer, bring your dancing shoes along, and if you are simply interested in watching, you can have a drink and relax and enjoy the sights.

The idea for this show came during their tour to Germany where they performed in the prestigious Leipzig Gewandhaus, and performed in Tango Clubs in Berlin, Leipzig and Tubingen.

Bookings essential!
Limited seats!

Bar and Restaurant available before, between and after shows.

When: Tuesday 22 October 2013,
Time: 7:30 for 8 pm & 9:30 for 10 pm

Price: R80

Bar and Restaurant available before, between and after shows.

Alexander Bar, 76 Strand Street , Cape Town CBD
MAP AND DIRECTIONS
VENUE PHOTOS

Booking: BOOK ONLINE
Information: 021 300 1652 / info@alexanderbar.co.za

ALEXANDER BAR ON FACEBOOK HERE
TWITTER : @alexanderbarct     /     @albertcombrink   /   @StanislavMusic      /     @TangoBand

CT TANGO ENSEMBLE ON FACEBOOK HERE

CT TANGO ENSEMBLE WEBSITE HERE.

ALBERT COMBRINK ARTIST PAGE ON FACEBOOK HERE.

Albert Combrink & Stanislav Angelov

Albert Combrink & Stanislav Angelov

____

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Tango in Cape Town – where to find it

I receive many comments and mails from Tango Lovers asking me where to find Tango in Cape Town. Lessons and Milongas are offered by a variety of venues. I put together this post of as much information as I have, simply in the spirit of “Tango-Unity”, and it will be updated and revised occasionally. I […]

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I receive many comments and mails from Tango Lovers asking me where to find Tango in Cape Town. Lessons and Milongas are offered by a variety of venues. I put together this post of as much information as I have, simply in the spirit of “Tango-Unity”, and it will be updated and revised occasionally. I know I have left people off, and it is not done in malice. Just drop me an email or leave a comment and i will be happy to update.

CT Tango Ensemble: Petrus de Beer, Charles Lazar, Albert Combrink, Stanislav Angelov

CT Tango Ensemble: Petrus de Beer, Charles Lazar, Albert Combrink, Stanislav Angelov

Cape Town Tango Ensemble:

The only Tango Orchestra in Cape Town, South Africa, and possibly even Africa. We play for serious concerts and recitals, as well as corporate functions and we are regularly invited to provide live music for dancing at Milongas hosted by various dancing-schools and dance-community members in South Africa.

Cape Tango Ensemble Website

Cape Tango Ensemble Facebook

Cape Tango Ensemble Twitter: @stanislavmusic @TangoBand @albertcombrink

Cape Town Tango Community

Tango Community on Facebook

TangoCapeTown

TangoCapeTown Website.
TangoCapeTown Mailinglist and email: info.tangocapetown@gmail.com

Libertango Cape Town

Libertango Website

Libertango Facebook

El Cacha Tango Company

El Cacha on Facebook

El Cacha Website

Cape Tango (Los Fanaticos)

Cape Tango Website.

I Love Tango in Cape Peninsula

Cape Town Tango Community page on Facebook

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