buy Cymbalta no prescription buy Zoloft without prescription tadacip buy citalopram online Celebrex No Prescription buy Isotretinoin without prescription Sildenafil no prescription Rimonabant buy Cialis Professional online buy Levitra Super Active online Effexor buy oral Levitra jelly

Video

Video: Divas Unite 2015

  Divas Unite for a Spectacular Star Studded Women’s Day Affair Cape Town City Hall came alive on Sunday 09 August with a spectacular performance from South Africa’s top female divas at the inaugural Divas Unite concert in celebration of Women’s Day. Some of SA’s top female artists including Zolani Mahola, lead singer of Freshlyground, […]

 

Divas Unite for a Spectacular Star Studded Women’s Day Affair

Cape Town City Hall came alive on Sunday 09 August with a spectacular performance from South Africa’s top female divas at the inaugural Divas Unite concert in celebration of Women’s Day.
Some of SA’s top female artists including Zolani Mahola, lead singer of Freshlyground, top South African sopranos Magdalene Minnaar and Zanne Stapelberg, stars of the musicals stage, Kim Kallie and grande dame Judy Page, as well as SAMA Award-winning instrumental pop group, Sterling EQ, young up-and-coming opera singer, Noluvuyiso Mpofu and the Sans Souci Girls High School representing Sing the Change completed the lineup and were accompanied by an all female Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of Brandon Phillips in a star studded concert that brought the crowd to their feet.
The beautiful and talented trio of Sterling EQ opened the show with the iconic Asturias (Leyenda). The three sopranos’ rendition of ‘I Feel Pretty’ from West Side Story set the scene for what was going to be a great afternoon. Zolani Mahola’s extremely emotional rendition of ‘I’d Like’ brought the crowd to tears before Kim Kallie’s ‘Cry Me a River’ followed by her mom Judy Page’s grande performance of ‘New York, New York’ saw the crowd into a 30 minute interval where guests were served complimentary Pongracz bubbly, Butlers Pizza, Frey Swiss Chocolate, cupcakes, tea and coffee.
A duet from broadway hit Phantom of the Opera by Darren Green and Magdalene Minnaar started proceedings again where they captured the audience with a powerful and passionate performance followed by Zanne Staplebergs ‘Milonga de la Anunciacion.’ The show reached its climax when all singers including MC Katlego Maboe came onto the stage for the Grand Finale to sing ‘We are the World’ together with the Sans Souci school choir. The audience roared with applause and rose for a grande standing ovation where they remained for the fun encore of Freshlyground’s song ‘Doo Be Doo,’ which had everyone dancing in the isles.
The event was brought to you by Opulent Living Experiences, and made possible by presenting partner Infiniti Luxury Cars and associate sponsors Gerlinde Moser RE/MAX, Pongracz, Frey Swiss Chocolate and Butlers Pizza.

Albert Combrink Divas Unite Expresso 6 August 2015 (1) Albert Combrink Divas Unite Expresso 6 August 2015 (3) Albert Combrink Divas Unite Expresso 6 August 2015 (6) Albert Combrink Divas Unite Expresso 6 August 2015 (8)

Video: Songs for Jenna – Kristi Lowe, Kim Kallie, Albert Combrink

Kristi Lowe, Kim Kallie and Albert Combrink A medley of songs, performed at the Baxter Theater, 7 September 2014, as part of CELEBRITY SUNDAY to raise funds for the Jenna Lowe Trust. See Photos of the show HERE.

Kristi Lowe, Kim Kallie and Albert Combrink

A medley of songs, performed at the Baxter Theater, 7 September 2014, as part of CELEBRITY SUNDAY to raise funds for the Jenna Lowe Trust.

See Photos of the show HERE.

Music for Easter: Silent Mourning (Music by Stephen van der Merwe to text from the Stabat Mater )

“Silent Mourning” by Steven van der Merwe Premiered at the La Motte Concert Series 5 April 2014 Read More: La Motte Website Read More: Press Release “Blute Nur” – Easter Lamentations with Lynelle Kenned (soprano), Albert Combrink (piano), Sally Minter (flute), Sarah Acres (cello) Dr Steven van der Merwe has been studying composition with Peter Louis van […]

“Silent Mourning” by Steven van der Merwe

Premiered at the La Motte Concert Series 5 April 2014

Read More: La Motte Website

Read More: Press Release

“Blute Nur” – Easter Lamentations with Lynelle Kenned (soprano), Albert Combrink (piano), Sally Minter (flute), Sarah Acres (cello)

Composer Dr Steven van der Merwe

Composer Dr Steven van der Merwe

Dr Steven van der Merwe has been studying composition with Peter Louis van Dijk and was awarded the degree M.Mus (composition) cum laude in 2013. He is also director/conductor of the Chamber Orchestra, Pro Musica Divina, which holds regular concerts in the Southern Peninsula. Steven’s composition “Eleven – a Requiem for a Parent” for choir and orchestra premiered at the St. George’s Cathedral in 2011 under his baton and with the talents of the UCT choir and the St. George’s Singers.

He has composed various other works for cello sextet; cello and piano as well as works for string orchestra. Other compositions include his “Blacksmith Mass” (for choir; organ and string quintet); “Dans la Pluie” (for Harp; flute and string orchestra (premiered by Liesl Stoltz and Jacqui Kerrod in 2012) and “Tantum Ergo” – composed for the Herschel chorale.

“Silent Mourning” was composed especially for today’s performance.  Albert Combrink requested a composition for flute; piano; soprano and cello.  The Latin text is taken from selected passages from the “Stabat Mater” or Mother Standing, a medieval poem regarding Mary’s suffering at the time of the Crucifixion.  The flute accompaniment is noted for it “gliding” technique in places, in an attempt to allow for an “Eastern” sense of solemnity.  Note the heavily accented open fifths towards the end of the piece in the cello, depicting the nails being struck during the Crucifixion.

The Text:

Silent Mourning

At the Cross her station keeping,
stood the mournful Mother weeping,
close to her Son to the last.

Christ above in torment hangs,
she beneath beholds the pangs
of her dying glorious Son.

Is there one who would not weep,
Till His spirit forth He sent.

"Silent Mourning" Dr Steven van der Merwe

Steven van der Merwe “Silent Mourning” pg 1

 

Steven van der Merwe "Silent Mourning" pg 2

Steven van der Merwe “Silent Mourning” pg 2

la-motte-logo1

Pedacito de cielo: CT Tango Ensemble LIVE (Artscape 2014)

Tengo un paraíso con tus besos, Tengo un pedacito de este cielo – I have a small piece of the sky, I have paradise in your kisses LISTEN: The delightful Tango Vals Pedacito de cielo (Music by Francini & Stamponi and lyrics by Homero Expósito) performed by Juan Simon & CT Tango Ensemble during a live performance at […]

Tengo un paraíso con tus besos, Tengo un pedacito de este cielo – I have a small piece of the sky, I have paradise in your kisses

LISTEN: The delightful Tango Vals Pedacito de cielo (Music by Francini & Stamponi and lyrics by Homero Expósito) performed by Juan Simon & CT Tango Ensemble during a live performance at Artscape Theater. It was recorded on their 3rd CD Tango Dreams.

Juan Simon & CT Tango Ensemble: Stanislav Angelov – Bandoneon & Accordeon / Albert Combrink – Piano / Petrus de Beer – Violin / Carles Lazar – Double Bass / Tango Dancers:  Emiliano Fernandez & Rachel Glaser from “Libertango Cape Town”

Performed in “Tango Dreams” at the Artscape Theater, Cape Town, South Africa – LIVE Amateur Video

CT Tango Ensemble in 2014 released their THIRD CD, “TANGO DREAMS” – available for purchase and download HERE.

Contact CT Tango Ensemble:
CT Tango Ensemble Website HERE.
CT Tango Ensemble on Facebook HERE.
CT Tango Ensemble on Twitter: @TangoBand /@StanislavMusic

BUY OTHER CT TANGO ENSEMBLE ALBUMS HERE:
In US$: HERE and HERE.
In ZAR: HERE.

Tango is more than music. It is the window to collected memories. –  Homero Expósito

Homero Aldo Expósito (Nicknamed Mimo) (November 5, 1918 - September 23, 1987)

(Nicknamed Mimo) (November 5, 1918 – September 23, 1987)

The lyrics of Pedacito de cielo by Homero Expósito (1918-1987) in the original Spanish and in rough English translation by Albert Combrink

La casa tenía una reja – The house had a fence 
pintada con quejas y cantos de amor – painted with complaints and love songs. 
La noche llenaba de ojeras  – The night filled with dark circles 
la reja, la hiedra  y el viejo balcón… – the fence, ivy and the old balcony …
Recuerdo que entonces reías  – I remember then laughed 
si yo te leía  mi verso mejor  – if I read my best verse
y ahora, capricho del tiempo, leyendo esos versos – and now, the whim of time, read these verses
¡lloramos los dos!  – Cried the two!

Los años de la infancia pasaron, pasaron… –  The years of childhood passed, passed …
La reja está dormida de tanto silencio  – The gate is asleep so quiet 
y en aquel pedacito de cielo se quedó tu alegría y mi amor – and in that little piece of heaven it was your joy and love.

Los años han pasado – The years have passed 
terribles, malvados, dejando esa esperanza que no ha de llegar – terrible, evil, leaving that hope has not arrived 
y recuerdo tu gesto travieso – and remember your gesture naughty 
después de aquel beso robado al azar… – after that kiss, random stolen …

Tal vez se enfrió con la brisa – Maybe the breeze cooled 
tu cálida risa, tu límpida voz… –  your warm laughter, your clear voice ...
Tal vez escapó a tus ojeras – Perhaps it escaped your dark circles 
la reja, la hiedra, y el viejo balcón… – the fence, ivy  and the old balcony ...
Tus ojos de azúcar quemada – Your eyes burnt sugar 
tenían distancias doradas al sol… –  distances were golden sun … 
¡Y hoy quieres hallar como entonces – And now you want to find and then 
la reja de bronce – the bronze gate 
temblando de amor!… trembling with love

Homero Aldo Expósito (November 5, 1918 – September 23, 1987) was an Argentine poet and tango songwriter. He was author, among other things, of the famous tangos like PercalNaranjo en florMargóFlor de linoQué me van a hablar de amorEse muchacho Troilo, and Te llaman Malevo. He used to compose with his brother Virgilio Expósito, who was responsible for the music. He was born in Campana and grew up in the city of Zárate, a very important city in the development of the tango. The name Expósito stems from the fact that Homero’s father had been an orphan and had decided to adopt this surname meaning “of unknown origin”.

Download Free Sheet Music of the Tango Vals “Pedacito de cielo” (Music by Francini & Stamponi and lyrics by Homero Expósito) 

Pedacito_de_cielo1

CT Tango Ensemble & Juan Simon during the show "Tango Dreams" at Artscape Theater 2014

CT Tango Ensemble & Juan Simon during the show “Tango Dreams” at Artscape Theater 2014

 

Volver (Carlos Gardel): CT Tango Ensemble

“Que veinte anos no es nada” – “Twenty years in the blink of an eye” “Volver”: Juan Simon & CT Tango Ensemble: Stanislav Angelov – Bandoneon & Accordeon / Albert Combrink – Piano / Petrus de Beer – Violin / Carles Lazar – Double Bass Performed in “Tango Dreams” at the Artscape Theater, Cape Town, South […]

volver
Buenos Aires
Carlos Gardel
180px-Le_Pera_Alfredo
Free Volver Sheet Music Carlos Gardel Page 1
Free Volver Sheet Music Carlos Gardel Page 2

volver

“Que veinte anos no es nada” – “Twenty years in the blink of an eye”

“Volver”: Juan Simon & CT Tango Ensemble: Stanislav Angelov – Bandoneon & Accordeon / Albert Combrink – Piano / Petrus de Beer – Violin / Carles Lazar – Double Bass

Performed in “Tango Dreams” at the Artscape Theater, Cape Town, South Africa – LIVE Amateur Video

CT Tango Ensemble in 2014 released their THIRD CD, “TANGO DREAMS” – available for purchase and download HERE.

Contact CT Tango Ensemble:
CT Tango Ensemble Website HERE.
CT Tango Ensemble on Facebook HERE.
CT Tango Ensemble on Twitter: @TangoBand /@StanislavMusic

BUY OTHER CT TANGO ENSEMBLE ALBUMS HERE:
In US$: HERE and HERE.
In ZAR: HERE.

“Con el alma aferrada a un dulce recuerdo” – To the soul a sweet memory clings

More about the song “Volver” and it’s Composer Carlos Gardel and the lyricist Alfredo le Pera

Carlos Gardel (born Charles Romuald Gardes; 11 December 1890 – 24 June 1935) was a singer, songwriter, composer and actor, and one of the most prominent figures in the history of tango. The unerring musicality of Gardel’s exquisite voice (some describe it as a tenor, others a lyric baritone) and the dramatic phrasing of his lyrics made miniature masterpieces of his hundreds of three-minute tango recordings. Together with lyricist and collaborator Alfredo Le Pera (1900-1935), Gardel wrote several classic tangos. In a space of roughly three years, the team produced some of the most-loved tango songs of all time, as fresh and popular today as they were in the lifetime of their creators.

Film star, singer, composer. Blessed with looks and voice.

Film star, singer, composer. Blessed with looks and voice.

” Que es un soplo la vida” – Life is but a breath

Dying tragically in a plane crash, young and beautiful at the height of his career, Gardel became an archetypal tragic hero mourned throughout Latin America. For many, Gardel embodies the soul of the tango style. He is commonly referred to as “Carlitos”, “El Zorzal” (The Song Thrush), “The King of Tango”, “El Mago” (The Magician), “El Morocho del Abasto” (The Brunet Boy from Abasto), and “El Mudo” (The Mute). (See the bottom of the article for a selected list of his compositions)

The wall of the Bueons-Aires Tango Club El Abasto

The wall of the Buenos-Aires Tango Club El Abasto (the photo was taken before their renovations were complete)

Gardel was famous as a handsome actor, singer and composer. He wrote the now very famous Tango-canción “Volver” for the film El Día Que Me Quieras (The day that you will love me),  in which he starred as well. The first recording was produced in New York, at “Victor” studios, on the 19th of March, 1935, almost exactly three months before both the composer and the lyricist met their tragic deaths in a plane crash. Gardel and Le Pera were coming to the end of a promotional tour for the film, when, on 24 June 1935, the plane in which they were taking off from the airport in Medellin, Colombia crashed into another plane on the runway, killing them both and most of the other passengers on board, including the other musicians travelling with them.

Lyricist, journalist, screenplay-writer Alfredo le Pera

Alfredo le Pera: lyricist, journalist & screenplay-writer.

Alfredo Le Pera (1900-1935), was born in São Paulo, Brazil, the son of Italian immigrants who moved to Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1902. At the beginning of his career, he worked for several Argentinian periodicals as a journalist and theatre critic and in 1928 became involved in the film industry. He worked for Paramount Pictures while living in Paris and in 1932 the studio arranged for him to work with Carlos Gardel, at a time when the company was looking for ways to increase Gardel’s international appeal . Le Pera wrote the scripts for a series of films, including Melodía de Arrabal (1933), Cuesta abajo (1934), El Tango en Broadway (1934), El día que me quieras (1935) and Tango Bar (1935), and also wrote the lyrics for tangos composed and performed by Gardel in these films. These tangos would become classics of the genre across the Spanish-speaking world.

 

Download Free Sheet Music for “Volver” (Carlos Gardel)

Free Volver Sheet Music Carlos Gardel Page 1

Free Volver Sheet Music Carlos Gardel Page 2

 

“Volver” (Carlos Gardel – music/Alfredo Le Pera – lyrics, 1935)

Lyris in Spanish (Castellan0)

Yo adivino el parpadeo
de las luces que a lo lejos,
van marcando mi retorno…
Son las mismas que alumbraron,
con sus palidos reflejos,
hondas horas de dolor.
Y aunque no quise el regreso,
siempre se vuelve al primer amor.
La quieta calle donde el eco dijo:
Tuya es su vida, tuyo es su querer,
bajo el burlon mirar de las estrellas
que con indiferencia hoy me ven volver…

Volver,
con la frente marchita,
las nieves del tiempo
platearon mi sien…
Sentir… que es un soplo la vida,
que veinte anos no es nada,
que febril la mirada
errante en la sombras
te busca y te nombra.
Vivir,
con el alma aferrada
a un dulce recuerdo,
que lloro otra vez…

Tengo miedo del encuentro
con el pasado que vuelve
a enfrentarse con mi vida…
Tengo miedo de las noches
que, pobladas de recuerdos,
encadenan mi sonar…
Pero el viajero que huye
tarde o temprano detiene su andar…
Y aunque el olvido, que todo destruye,
haya matado mi vieja ilusion,
guardo escondida una esperanza humilde
que es toda la fortuna de mi corazon.

Vivir… con el alma aferrada
a un dulce recuerdo
que lloro otra vez…

“Volver” (Carlos Gardel – music/Alfredo Le Pera – lyrics, 1935)

Lyris in ENGLISH

I imagine the flickering
of the lights that in the distance
will be marking my return.
They’re the same that lit,
with their pale reflections,
deep hours of pain
And even though I didn’t want to come back,
you always return to your first love
The tranquil street where the echo said
yours is her life, yours is her love,
under the mocking gaze of the stars
that, with indifference, today see me return.

To return
with withered face,
the snows of time
have whitened my temples.
To feel… that life is a puff of wind,
that twenty years is nothing,
that the feverish look,
wandering in the shadow,
looks for you and names you.
To live…
with the soul clutched
to a sweet memory
that I cry once again

I am afraid of the encounter
with the past that returns
to confront my life
I am afraid of the nights
that, filled with memories,
shackle my dreams.
But the traveler that flees
sooner or later stops his walking
And although forgetfulness, which destroys all,
has killed my old dream,
I keep concealed a humble hope
that is my heart’s whole fortune.

To live… with the soul clutched
to a sweet memory
that I cry once again

 

The ONE AND ONLY Carlos Gardel singing his song,”Volver”
(Carlos Gardel – music/Alfredo Le Pera – lyrics)

“Un dulce recuerdo, que lloro otra vez” – A sweet memory, I cry again…

Music Compositions

Gardel wrote the music and Alfredo Le Pera the lyrics for the following compositions:

  • Amargura (tango)
  • Amores de Estudiante (waltz)
  • Apure, delantero buey (song)
  • Arrabal amargo (tango)
  • Caminito soleado (song)
  • Cheating muchachita
  • Criollita, deci que si (song)
  • Cuesta abajo (tango)
  • El día que me quieras (song)
  • Golondrinas (tango)
  • Guitarra, guitarra mia
  • La criolla
  • La vida en un trago
  • Lejana tierra mia (song)
  • Los panchos en Buenos Aires
  • Melodia de arrabal (tango)
  • Mi Buenos Aires querido (tango, 1934)
  • Olvido
  • Por tu boca roja
  • Por una cabeza (tango, 1935)
  • Quiereme
  • Recuerdo malevo (tango)
  • Rubias de New York (foxtrot)
  • Soledad (tango)
  • Suerte negra (waltz)
  • Sus ojos se cerraron (tango)
  • Viejos tiempos (tango)
  • Volver (tango, 1934)
  • Volvio una noche (tango)

Shozaloza: Train of dream and struggle

“Shozaloza African Voices” Bukelwa Velem, Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr and Jazz Band: Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums). Live Amateur footage from the Oudelibertas Amphitheater Show, Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 2014 To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com Read more […]

“Shozaloza African Voices”

Bukelwa Velem, Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr

and Jazz Band:

Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums).


Live Amateur footage from the Oudelibertas Amphitheater Show, Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 2014

To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com

Read more about the original show here.

See photos from the shows here.

Members of “Shozaloza African Voices” have taken part in Cape Town Opera productions as soloists and chorus members. Their experience with Jazz influenced works such as Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha, Jerome Kern’s Showboat, Kurt Weil’s Lost in the Stars and Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess make them ideal interpreters of this work from the South African cultural heritage.

Download a Free Pdf of the Sheet Music of the song “SHOZALOZA”:

Shosholoza__SATB_ACappella

More about the song “SHOZALOZA”

Although the original author of the song is unknown, “Shosholoza” is a traditional miner’s song, originally sung by groups of men from the Ndebele ethnic group that travelled by steam train from their homes in Zimbabwe to work in South Africa’s diamond and gold mines. The Ndebele live predominantly in Zimbabwe (formerly, Rhodesia) near its border with South Africa, and they can also be found in the northern border of South Africa. The song mixes Ndebele and Zulu words and is Zimbabwean in origin even though the two ethnic groups are very similar.

Some people argue that the song describes the journey to the mines in South Africa, while others say it describes the return to Zimbabwe. It is also sometimes sung “stimela si phume Rhodesia”. It is accepted that  Zulu workers later took up the song to generate rhythm during group tasks and to alleviate boredom and stress. The song was sung by working miners in time with the rhythm of swinging their axes to dig. It was usually sung under hardship in call and response style (one man singing a solo line and the rest of the group responding by copying him). It was also sung by prisoners in call and response style using alto, soprano part divided by row. Former South African President Nelson Mandela describes how he sang Shosholoza as he worked during his imprisonment on Robben Island. He describes it as “a song that compares the apartheid struggle to the motion of an oncoming train” and goes on to explain that “the singing made the work lighter”.

In contemporary times, it is used in varied contexts in South Africa to show solidarity in sporting events and other national events to relay the message that the players are not alone and are part of a team.

 

Meaning

The song was usually sung to express the hardship of working in the mines. It expresses heartache over the hard work performed in the mines. The word Shosholoza or “chocholoza!” means go forward or make way for the next man, in Ndebele. It is used as a term of encouragement and hope for the workers as a sign of solidarity. The sound “sho sho” uses onomatopoeia and reminiscent of the sound made by the steam train (stimela). Stimela is the Zulu word for steam train.”Kulezo ntaba!” means (At those far away mountains), “Stimela Siphume eZimbabwe” (the train come from Zimbabwe), “Wen´ uya baleka” (Because you’re running away/hurrying). In contemporary times, its meaning is to show support for any struggle.

Lyrics

Lyrics Shosholoza

Shosholoza, shosholoza (Moving fast, moving strong)
Ku lezontaba (Through those mountains)
Stimela sphuma eSouth Africa (Train from South Africa)
Wenu yabaleka (You are leaving)
Wenu yabaleka (You are leaving)
Ku lezontaba (Through those mountains)
Stimela siphum’ eSouth Africa (Train from South Africa) 

The lyrics of the song vary, as do the transcriptions. In the older traditional styles, the words translate to “train from Rhodesia”.

Shosholoza
Kulezo ntaba
Stimela siphume South Africa
Kulezo ntaba
Stimela siphume South Africa
Wen’ uyabaleka
Kulezo ntaba
Stimela siphume South Africa

A rough translation:

Go forward
Go forward
from those mountains
on this train from South Africa
Go forward
Go forward
You are running away
You are running away
from those mountainson this train from Zimbabwe

One slightly sanitised version made popular at sporting events, goes like this:

English Translation of “Shoshaloza”:
Work, work, working in the sun
We will work as one
Shosholoza
Work, work, working in the rain
Till there’s sun again
Shosholoza
Push, push pushing on and on
There’s much to be done
Shosholoza
Push, push, pushing in the sun
We will push as one.
” Shosholoza is now a traditional staple in South Africa, and is celebrated by many cultures within the Rainbow Nation. When writing to a close friend in Cape Town about his thoughts on Shosholoza, and the significance of it to him as a young adult, he said,It fills me with a lot of pride in South Africa and in my lifetime has helped me to connect with my own sense of what it is to be from here. I remember my first experiences of it being during the 1995 world cup and that it was something black and white people sang together. Unity.-Edward O’Reilly, age 24. Firelight Foundation

Video: Gershwin’s “Summertime” – Shozaloza African Voices LIVE

Video: Gershwin’s “Summertime” – “Shozaloza African Voices” Bukelwa Velem ,Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr and Jazz Band: Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums).     To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com Read more about the original show here. See photos […]

Video: Gershwin’s “Summertime” – “Shozaloza African Voices”

Bukelwa Velem ,Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr

and Jazz Band: Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums).

 

 

To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com

Read more about the original show here.

See photos from the shows here.

Live Amateur footage from the Oudelibertas Amphitheater Show, Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 2014

Members of “Shozaloza African Voices” have taken part in Cape Town Opera productions as soloists and chorus members. Their experience with Jazz influenced works such as Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha, Jerome Kern’s Showboat,  Kurt Weil’s Lost in the Stars and Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess make them ideal interpreters of this work flowing between jazz and classical operatic genres.

Follow Albert on Twitter:
@albertcombrink

Find “The Summertime Connection” on FACEBOOK.

More about Gershwin’s song “Summertime”:

An Opera Aria that became a Jazz Standard, Gershwin’s “Summertime”has gained international fame as one of the most recorded songs of all time, with almost 35 ooo known recordings. Gershwin began composing the song/opera aria, for inclusion in his opera Porgy and Bess(America’s first serious “Jazz-Opera” after Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha” ) in December 1933. He attempted to create his own spiritual in the style of the African American folk music of the period. 

Two main sources of inspiration are usually quoted about this song:
1) The Book by DuBose Heyward had been presented as a play, and the spiritual “Sometimes I feel, like a motherless child”) was sung at the end. [Rosenberg, Deena (1991). Fascinating Rhythm: The Collaboration of George and Ira Gershwin. Penguin Books USA. ISBN 0-525-93356-5., p. 281]  The opening intervals of  “Summertime” do contain a melodic cell that reminds one of the spiritual.

2) The Ukrainian-Canadian composer and singer Alexis Kochan has suggested that some part of Gershwin’s inspiration may have come from having heard the Ukrainian lullaby, Oi Khodyt Son Kolo Vikon (A Dream Passes By The Windows) at a New York City performance by Oleksander Koshetz‘s Ukrainian National Chorus in 1929 (or 1926). [Helen Smindak, DATELINE NEW YORK: Kochan and Kytasty delve deeply into musical past, The Ukrainian Weekly, 24 May 1998]

Gershwin had completed setting DuBose Heyward’s poem to music by February 1934, and spent the next 20 months completing and orchestrating the score of the opera. [Howard Pollack, George Gershwin: his life and work, University of California Press, 2006, p.589]

The song is sung multiple times throughout Porgy and Bess, first by Clara in Act I as a lullaby and soon after as counterpoint to the craps game scene, in Act II in a reprise by Clara, and in Act III by Bess, singing to Clara’s baby. It was recorded for the first time by Abbie Mitchell on 19 July 1935, with George Gershwin playing the piano and conducting the orchestra (on: George Gershwin Conducts Excerpts from Porgy & Bess, Mark 56 667).

Video: Back of the Moon (Matshikiza): Shozaloza African Voices Live

Video: Back of the Moon (Matshikiza): Shozaloza African Voices Live “Shozaloza African Voices”:  Bukelwa Velem ,Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr and Jazz Band: Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums). To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com Read more about the original […]

Video: Back of the Moon (Matshikiza): Shozaloza African Voices Live

“Shozaloza African Voices”:  Bukelwa Velem ,Babongile Manga, Miranda Tini, Lusindiso Dubula and Lindile Kula Jr

and Jazz Band:

Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums).

To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com

Read more about the original show here.

See photos from the shows here.

Live Amateur footage from the Oudelibertas Amphitheater Show, Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 2014

 King Kong is of course one of the most famous American films ever made (and remade). The story of the giant ape transported from a faraway island to New York, captured the imagination of millions since its first release in 1933. South Africa however, has its own King Kong. In 1958  King Kong became the first all African Jazz Opera, with a star studded local cast including Miriam Makeba and the Manhattan Brothers, Kippie Moeketsi, Abigail Kubheka and Hugh Masekela.

Miranda Tini

Soloist is  Miranda Tini, whose extraordinary voice has thrilled audiences locally and internationally in roles as diverse as Jezibaba from Dvorak’s Rusalka and Mariah in Porgy and Bess praised at the Cardiff Millennium Centre in Wales, for her “powerful stage presence and equally powerful voice.” (Bill Kenny: Music Web International) 

Members of “Shozaloza African Voices” have taken part in Cape Town Opera productions as soloists and chorus members. Their experience with Jazz influenced works such as Scott Joplin’s Treemonisha, Jerome Kern’s Showboat,  Kurt Weil’s Lost in the Stars and Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess make them ideal interpreters of this neglected work from the South African cultural heritage.

In 1956, the Syndicate of African Artists commissioned Todd Matshikiza to write a large work for choir and orchestra. The composer had written successful choral works before, but since no orchestra was available, Uxolo was created on a massive scale for choirs and brass band. The success of this work – with its jazzy undertones, led in part to the creation of the musical/Jazz Opera King Kong. Lyrics were by Pat Williams. Matshikiza wrote the music as well of some of the lyrics (some in African languages).

Miriam Makeba: Our beloved “Mama Africa”

Lead roles were taken by Nathan Mdledle and Miriam Makeba, who created the role of Shebeen Queen Joyce, the matriarch running the Back of the Moon watering hole. This role brought Mama Africa Makeba international attention and launched a singing career that sustained her throughout her life as an Apartheid exile. The 63 member cast was backed by the cream of South Africa’s jazz musicians, including the now legendary reed playerKippie Moketsi.

 An_Evening_With_Belafonte_Makeba

Opening early in 1959 at the Wits University Great Hall, the show was an immediate success. By the time the show travelled to London in 1961, 200 000 South Africans, had seen the show. The life of boxer Ezekial Dhlamini was good material for a stage work. His meteoric rise to the top of South Africa’s boxing world as the famous ‘King Kong’ was in sad contrast to his descent into drunkenness, violence and murder. He killed himself by drowning at age 32. Matshikiza had covered Dhlamini’s 1950’s trial for treason as a journalist and was aboviously well-acquainted with his subject matter. According to The Daily Mail & Guardian, “Matshikiza understood his central character, and, more importantly, understood the whole world that surrounded ‘King Kong’. He understood the whole black world of the townships that fed Johannesburg and the histories of the people who filled those townships.” ~ Craig Harris, All Music Guide

 

Composer and author Todd Matshikiza

Todd Matshikiza (1921-1968)  is considered by many, as belonging to the royalty of South African music. One of a family of 10 – all of whom instrumentalists and singers –  Todd started piano lessons at the age of 6. As an adult he ran theTodd Matshikiza School of Music, where he also taught the piano. From 1949 to 1954, Matshikiza was a committee member of the Syndicate of African Artists. This group aimed to promote music in the townships by getting visiting artists to perform there. Finding it difficult to make a living as a jazz musician, he joined the editorial staff of Drum Magazine.  He wrote a jazz column covering the township scene, particularly in Sophiatown, where he commented on the likes of Kippie Moeketsi and Hugh Masekela who both played for the The Jazz Epistles. He also covered township life in his regular column With the lid off.

South African arts bosses should take note:  the time is surely right for a revival of King Kong.With local musicians taking  an active interest in the history of black jazz in this country, it would be a pleasant surprise if the Department of Arts, Culture, Science and Technology would also take such an active interest in the preservation of this piece of cultural heritage.

Read more about Todd Matshikiza at africancomposers.co.za andsacomposers.co.za

 

Video: Stormy Weather (Harold Arlen) – Miranda Tini

Stormy Weather (Harold Arlen & Ted Koehler) – Miranda Tini & Jazz Band “Shozaloza African Voices” and Jazz Band: Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums). Miranda Tini’s extraordinary voice has thrilled audiences locally and internationally in roles as diverse as Jezibaba from Dvorak’s Rusalka and Mariah in Porgy and Bess praised […]

Stormy Weather (Harold Arlen & Ted Koehler) – Miranda Tini & Jazz Band

“Shozaloza African Voices” and Jazz Band:

Albert Combrink (Piano & Musical Director), Darryl Andrews (Bass), Alvyn Dyers (Guitar), Ivan Bell (Drums).

Miranda Tini’s extraordinary voice has thrilled audiences locally and internationally in roles as diverse as Jezibaba from Dvorak’s Rusalka and Mariah in Porgy and Bess praised at the Cardiff Millennium Centre in Wales, for her “powerful stage presence and equally powerful voice.” (Bill Kenny: Music Web International). Here she surprises Cape Town with a knock-out Jazz Number.

To book the Musicians, please contact albertcombrink@gmail.com

Read more about the original show here.

See photos from the shows here.

Live Amateur footage from the Oude Libertas Amphitheater Show, Stellenbosch, South Africa, February 2014

Stormy Weather”  written by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler. in 1933. Ethel Waters first sang it at The Cotton Club night club in Harlem in 1933 and recorded it that year, and in the same year it was sung in London by Elisabeth Welch and recorded by Frances Langford. It has since been performed by artists as diverse asFrank Sinatra, Clodagh Rodgers, and Reigning Sound and most famously by Lena Horne and Billie Holiday. Leo Reisman’s orchestra version had the biggest hit on records (with Arlen himself as vocalist), although Ethel Waters’s recorded version also sold well. “Stormy Weather” was featured in the 1943 movie of the same name.

The song tells of disappointment, as the lyrics, “Don’t know why there’s no sun up in the sky”, show someone pining for her man to return. The weather is a metaphor for the feelings of the singer: “stormy weather since my man and I ain’t together, keeps raining all the time.”

The original handwritten lyrics, along with a painting by Ted Koehler, were featured on the (US) Antiques Roadshow on 24 January 2011, where they were appraised for between $50,000 and $100,000. The lyrics show a number of crossings out and corrections.

Ethel Waters’s recording of the song in 1933 was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2003, and the Library of Congress honored the song by adding it to the National Recording Registry in 2004.

Meadowlands: a song about what black people say about what white people say

MeadowLands (Strike Vilakazi) “Meadowlands“ is one of the most enduring melodies in South African music. The song was composed by Strike Vilakazi in 1956 as a moving, emotional comment on the forced removal of Sophiatown’s residents to the newly created township of Meadowlands, which is now part of Soweto, The lyrics are sung in three different languages […]

MeadowLands (Strike Vilakazi)

“Meadowlands“ is one of the most enduring melodies in South African music. The song was composed by Strike Vilakazi in 1956 as a moving, emotional comment on the forced removal of Sophiatown’s residents to the newly created township of Meadowlands, which is now part of Soweto, The lyrics are sung in three different languages Zulu, Sesotho and tsotsitaal, the language of the streets- a mixture of English, Afrikaans, Zulu, Sesotho and Tswana. The lyrics are  ambiguous in their assessment, for or against, the government’s action. The white government thought the song supported their actions, but in reality it was a protest song about people refusing to go to Meadowlands.

Soweto_township

Africans perceived the forced removals as a cleaning up of the country, erasing ‘black spots’ to make ‘the picture look white.’ Sophiatown was rebuilt as white suburb called Triomf, the Afrikaans word for triumph. The removals sparked the creation of a song called “Meadowlands”, in reference to the Meadowlands township to which many Sophiatown residents were forced relocate. The lyrics express the devastation of the evacuation: “we will move all night and day/to go stay in meadowlands/you’ll hear the white people saying/let’s go to meadowlands.”

Dolly Rathebe on the cover of Drum Magazine (1928-2004)

Dolly Rathebe on the cover of the July 1955 Drum Magazine (1928-2004)

“Meadowlands” has a swing melody, and is sung in African languages, which masked its indictment of the callousness of white racism. so that white government officials and politicians, unable to understand, at the time thought the song was cheerful.

Read an interesting article Michela Versbow about the forced removals and the role of music in the South African struggle HERE.

The song was made famous by African Jazz Pioneers with Dolly Rathebe

The Zulu or Sesotho verse roughly translates to:

Let‘s go, let‘s go ,let‘s go to Meadowlands
We‘ll work night and day, going straight to Meadowlands
Have you heard what the white people say?
Let‘s all go to Meadowlands…
Our beloved place

The tsotsitaal version translates to something else:

Have you heard what the tstotsis all say
We are not leaving; we‘re are staying right here
Staying here, staying here
Staying here in our beloved place

The ambiguity is enhanced further by mixing Sesotho with tsotsitaal

Utla a utlwa makgowa a re a re yeng eMeadowlands (Sesotho)
You will hear the whites saying let‘s go to Meadowlands
Meadowlands, Meadowlands,
ons daak nie ons pola hie (tsotsitaal)
We are not leaving, we are staying right here